General

Painting on Water Turkish Marbling in ISTANBUL
Ebru Lessons in Istanbul

Painting On Water: Turkish Marbling Turkish Paper marbling is a method of aqueous surface design, which can roduce patterns similar to marble or other stone, hence the name. The patterns are the result of color floated on either plain water or a viscous solution known as size, and then carefully transferred to a sheet of paper (or other surfaces such as fabric). In bru art, you can draw flower figures that are traditional from the Ottoman period BUT the things that you can capable of by using Ebru art is unlimited. All you need is your imagination.

This decorative material has been used to cover a variety of surfaces for several centuries. It is often employed as a writing surface for calligraphy, and especially book covers and endpapers in bookbinding and stationery. Part of its appeal is that each print is a unique monoprint.

Need a break from the hustle and bustle of tourist life in Istanbul? Come take an art class with the remarkable Turkish artist Betul !

LEARN the secrets of creating the rich patterns of handmade marble paper .

EXPERIENCE the sensuous flow of Ottoman Marble ( Ebru ).

CONTEMPORARY create design fabric marbling paper technique designs on paper, glass or on silk fabrics .

Our teacher that is shown in our pictures is Ms. Betul Senguler. She gives our group classes in Sultanahmet. For private lessons we have one more teacher as well.

 

About The Artists :

Betul Senguler : Our professional Ebru Artist for our group & private classes in Sultanahmet with the experience of 8 yrs in Ottoman Marbling.

** If you have any interest of learning Classical Ottoman Marble, joining a workshop or ordering a special Turkish Marble Art Work from our teacheri please call us or send us an E-mail to get more information and to get a meeting..

2 Hours Turkish Marbling Workshop ( Per Person )
2 Guest
55 Euro
3-6 Guest
50 Euro
7 and More Guest
45 Euro
1 Guest
70 Euro
Lesson Includes.
  • These are private events and runs upon request.
  • English Guidance and assistance service.
  • Workshop area & equipments are included.
  • 2 Hours workshop in our Studio.
  • Reservation by E-mail
  • Tours are made by Senguler Tourism – Istanbul Life ORG
    Member of TURSAB Agency Association / A Licence: 4691

Turkish Marbling Ebru By Paper

Turkish Marbling Ebru By Fabric instead of Paper

Little Kids are making Turkish Marbling Lesson

TURKISH MARBLING, EBRU

Marbled paper, called ebru in Turkish, was used extensively in the binding of books and within the calligraphic panels in Turkey. The existing word ebre in Eastern Turkish, meaning variegated, points to the fact that marbling might have been known by the populations of Central Asia. Its origin might ultimately hark back to China, where a document from the T’ang dynasty (618-907) mentions a process of coloring paper on water with five hues. In the early examples from the 16th c. in the Ottoman-Turkish era, ebru appears in the battal (stone) form, namely without any manipulation. Interestingly, several variations developed in time, giving us types such as gelgit, tarakli, hatip, bülbül yuvasi, çiçekli (respectively come-and-go, combed, preacher, nightingale’s nest, flowered, etc.) An attempt has been made here to show some of its principal patterns, with samples by the master marblers of this century chosen from our collection.

Ebru technique consists of sprinkling colours containing a few drops of ox-gall on to the surface of the bath sized with kitre (gum tragacanth) in a trough. By carefully laying the paper over the bath, the floating picture on top of it is readily transferred to the paper; thus, each ebru is a one of a kind print. To obtain beautiful ebru results, one needs to have a light hand, refined taste, and an open mind to the unexpected patterns forming on the water. Patience and a good knowledge of traditional culture are characteristic of ebru masters.

After the 1550’s, booklovers in Europe prized ebru, which came to be known as ‘Turkish papers’. Many specimens in their collections and in the several album amicorum books are visible today in various museums. Also, early texts dealing with ebru, such as “Discourse on decorating paper in the Turkish manner”, published in 1664 by Athanasius Kircher in Rome, helped to disseminate the knowledge of this kind of marbling art. There is agreement amongst scholars that the so-called Turkish Papers played a colourful influence on the book arts in Europe.

Ebru Marbling is a unique art which many painting and design lovers like to do in their spare time and especially demonstrate to their friends on different occasions. Nevertheless, this spectacular piece of art does have many applications in daily life where it is used to enhance the decor and look of the goods. This patterned paper is extensively used in the binding of books and within the calligraphic panels in Turkey. In addition to this, “ebru” works are often framed as pictures and used all over the world as a piece of decoration. Other than paper work, the pattern is often designed on leather, glass, cloth, furniture, book covers, notebooks, invitations, and many other areas to reflect the unique glamour of this art.

Professional Turkish Marbling Set

Gum tragacanth – Dye – Paintbrush – Basin – Water – Paper – Gall – Comb

  • A3 – 29.72 x 41.91 cm Size Ebru Tank
  • Ebru Water Powder ( Tragacanth )
  • Ox Gall 200 ml.
  • 6 set of Natural Ebru Dyes ( Paste & Concentrate Dyes )
    ( Red – Turquoise– Yellow – Green – Black – )
  • 6 pieces of Natural Brushes  ( Rose Wood & Horse Tail )
  • 30pcs. Of Ebru Paper.
  • 5 Pieces of Biz Set ( Used for drawing on water )
  • Normal Comb // There is Long Comb ( 20 Euro ) & Peacock Comb ( 25 Euro )  that can be used for different techniques.

MATERIALS USED IN CLASSICAL TURKISH MARBLING

Our Professional Marbling Set is Available for Purchase in Our Gallery. We can also mail it all over the world.

Set Cost : 200 Euro + Shipping.
For Order : info@istanbullife.org

 

An Introduction to Turkish Marbling

Marbling, or ebru, is one of the most popular forms of Turkish art. We decided to introduce ourselves to the technique, and joined a workshop offered by Les Arts Turcs /Istanbul Life ORG in Sultanahmet. By the end of the entertaining session, we had managed to create a few minor masterpieces.

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Ebru has been a part of the Turkish art scene for centuries, and has long been a specialty of Istanbul’s dervish orders. Contributing to the technique’s popularity is the fact that it’s easy to learn; even an absolute beginner can create an impressive piece of art. Basically, you drip paint on top of water, use needles and brushes to make swirling designs, and then transfer the finished work onto paper. The paints are treated with ox gall to lower their surface tension, allowing them to float, and the water’s properties result in fluid, hypnotic patterns.

Les Arts Turcs /Istanbul Life ORG is a small gallery and artspace near the Topkapi Palace that both sells and displays original pieces, and offers classes in Turkish techniques such as ebru and calligraphy. And they let you get right to the fun stuff: within a couple minutes of entering the workshop, we were bent over trays of water, applying our first dabs of color. Marbling is something which doesn’t require a lot of prior instruction.

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My first painting was going wonderfully. Having chosen a background palette of orange, blue and white, I had used a comb to swirl the colors into a mesmerizing pattern. But then I screwed it all up by adding giant flowers. Somehow (and perhaps my inner artist should have realized this) red and pink flowers on a blue-orange background don’t look good. My inner artist is an idiot.

Luckily, my inner bullshitter is always willing to step up. “Exactly what I was going for!” I announced, proudly displaying my ridiculous pink-on-orange monstrosity to everyone in the room, daring them to call my bluff.

Flowers were the preferred motive during our workshop. We learned to make carnations, tulips, roses, violets and chrysanthemums. And then, just to mix it up, we did some trees. Since Islam isn’t big on the artistic representation of the human form, plants and flowers are popular themes in Turkish art. Anyway, the colorful and geometric flower shapes suit the technique of marbling perfectly.

We had a great morning at Les Arts Turcs / Istanbul Life ORG; marbling makes for a fun cultural experience, far removed from visiting mosques and museums.

 

For 75 Euro per person, you’re provided instruction, and the chance to make a number of paintings, which you can take home. A more personal souvenir is hard to imagine.

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